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Abnormal Plant Growths from Fasciation

Flattened stems, a proliferation of buds and blooms and even two headed flowers are a physiological disorder of plants known as fasciation.  The abnormal growth can occur spontaneously as a result of a hormonal imbalance, genetic mutation, the plant’s response to its environment, or for some unknown reason. 

You can often find fasciation occur on rudbeckias, foxgloves, hardy and daylilies, asparagus, willows, succulents, cacti and more than 100 species of plants.  The abnormal growth may occur on the stem, flower, fruit or roots and may be flattened, crested or contorted. There is usually no need to be concerned.

In fact, these unique growths have allowed plant breeders to propagate and introduce new varieties.  These include crested forms of celosia, fantail willow and beefsteak tomatoes.

A bit more information: If your plants are exhibiting other symptoms such as yellow leaves and stunted growth, you may want to investigate further. Galls, cankers and other strange growths can be caused by insect-feeding or disease-causing organisms.

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