• slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
  • slide
Problems-Growing-Hummingbird-Vine.jpg

Problems Growing Hummingbird Vine

I planted hummingbird vine 2 years ago, but it will not grow. I thought it wasn't getting enough sunlight, so I moved it to a sunnier spot.  That didn't work either. It won't even try to tie itself to the fence I have for them to climb.

Several vines go by the name hummingbird vine.  The large orange and yellow flowered trumpet vine (Campsis radicans) attaches to structures with aerial roots.  The bright orange, coral red or scarlet blooming honeysuckle vine (Lonicera) is also known for attracting hummingbirds.  It attaches to structures by twining around the support.  Provide the proper support such as a brick wall for the trumpet vine and trellis or arbor for the honeysuckle.  You may need to provide a bit of guidance and support in the beginning.  Secure the branches to the structure with twine or staking tape.  Once the vine makes contact it will continue to grow and cling to the structure on its own.  New plantings take several years to become established.  During this time much of the growth occurs underground.  Proper growing conditions and care will get your vine off and growing.  Trumpet vine prefers full sun and well drained soil. Avoid fertilization that encourages lots of leaves and no flowers.  Honeysuckle vines like full sun to part shade.  Though shade tolerant they are more likely to develop powdery mildew. Provide needed water and the proper light conditions to get them growing.        

Related