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Brown-Spots-on-Avocado-Tree-Leaves.jpg

Brown Spots on Avocado Tree Leaves

I planted an avocado tree last fall. Although it was little droopy this summer, it seemed to perk up again this fall. Except now it’s getting brown spots on all the biggest leaves. I’ve heard that they are supposed to be planted two together. Is that true? Could that be the problem? I have another one ready to plant. Any advice before I plant this one?

Avocado trees, hardy in zones 9B to 11, grow best in full sun or light shade in any well-drained soil.  The brown spots could be one of several diseases including leaf spot, anthracnose or scab. Rake and destroy the leaves as they drop from the tree to reduce the source for future infection.  Avoid overhead and nighttime watering that creates the perfect environment for disease.  Proper watering, clean up and a little cooperation from nature keep most diseases under control.  If the problem continues consult your local extension service for a definitive diagnosis and recommended control.  The lack of a second tree is not the cause of leaf spot.  The need for two trees is related to pollination and fruit production not tree health.  Though most avocados are self-fruitful (you only need one tree to produce fruit) they will have greater production when a second tree is added for cross-pollination.  Water all new and young plantings thoroughly and whenever the top few inches of soil are crumbly and moist.  Pay special attention the first two to three years as the tree becomes established.  Mulching the soil around the tree with bark or other organic materials will help keep the soil cool and moist.

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